Who decides the immunization schedule?

Each year, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) publishes immunization schedules for children, preteens and teens. These schedules summarize recommendations for routine vaccines for children age 18 years and younger. The recommended immunization schedules are approved by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

Why should I subject my son or daughter to a painful shot if vaccines aren’t 100% effective?

Few things in medicine work 100% of the time, but vaccines are one of the most effective weapons we have against disease — they work in 85% to 99% of cases. They greatly reduce your child’s risk of serious illness (particularly when more and more people use them) and give diseases fewer chances to take hold in a population. It can be difficult to watch kids get a shot, but the short-term pain is nothing compared with suffering through a potentially deadly bout of diphtheria, pertussis, or measles.

What is Herd Immunity?

• A form of immunity that occurs when a certain level of the population within a community is vaccinated against certain infectious diseases to protect those who may not be fully immunized or cannot be fully immunized.n• Typically it takes 90% of the population within a community to reach herd immunity. This is for each and every vaccine. n• For example 90% of the community should be immunized against Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR vaccine) for herd immunity to be reached.n• Herd immunity may also be called: Community Immunity, Social immunity, or Population immunity