Is the flu shot expensive?

The flu shot is very affordable. Most insurances pay for the vaccine without a co-pay. Ask your doctor about the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program, which provides vaccines for children ages 18 and younger who are uninsured and Medicaid-eligible.

Do I need 2 or 3 doses of the HPV vaccine?

It is recommended that 11-to-12-year-olds receive 2 doses of HPV vaccine at least 6 months apart to protect against cancers caused by HPV infections. Teens and young adults who start the series later, at ages 15 through 26 years, will need 3 doses. Clinical trials showing 2 doses of HPV vaccine in younger adolescent (aged 9-14 years) produced an immune response similar or higher than the response in young adults (aged 16-26 years) who received 3 doses.

Is the flu shot safe?

The flu vaccine has been studied very carefully and is safe. The CDC and FDA continue to monitor the safety of vaccines including all the influenza vaccinations available annually (as with each year the prevalence of different strains change). The CDC uses 3 systems to monitor the safety of vaccines including the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), Vaccines Safety Datalink (VSD), and the Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment Project (CISA). The immunization may cause mild symptoms, like soreness and a low fever, but that is not influenza. These symptoms usually go away a day or two after vaccination. You cannot get the flu from the flu shot.

Is the HPV vaccine safe?

Yes. HPV vaccines have been carefully studied and monitored for many years with no serious safety concerns. Since the HPV vaccine was approved in 2006, more than 80 million doses have been administered. The most common side effect reported was pain and swelling at the shot location in the arm, fever, dizziness and nausea. These side effects are the same for most vaccines.

Should I get the shot in the arm or nasal spray for the flu vaccine?

Both types of flu shot have been studied carefully and are safe. The CDC and FDA continue to monitor the safety of vaccines including all the influenza vaccinations available annually (as with each year the prevalence of different strains change). The CDC uses 3 systems to monitor the safety of vaccines including the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), Vaccines Safety Datalink (VSD), and the Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment Project (CISA). Talk to your doctor about which one is best for your child. Children, preteens and teens with chronic health conditions, like asthma, diabetes, or heart disease should NOT get the nasal spray vaccine and instead get the injectable (shot).

Is the HPV vaccine expensive?

Most insurance companies cover the HPV vaccine. Ask your doctor about the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program, which provides vaccines for children ages 18 and younger who are uninsured and Medicaid-eligible.

Does the HPV vaccine cause serious health problems?

No. There are many myths about the HPV vaccine. HPV vaccines have been and continue to be studied very carefully, with no serious safety concerns noted. The link to the brochure below lists some of the studies, and has links to that information. Since the vaccine was approved in 2006, more than 80 million doses of the HPV vaccine have been administered. The most common side effect reported was pain and swelling at the shot location in the arm, fever, dizziness and nausea. These are the same side effects reported for most vaccines.

Why do I need the Tdap vaccine?

The Tdap vaccine protects against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (whooping cough). Babies and toddlers receive a similar vaccine, but the protection wears off as children get older. Pre-teens and teens need a booster to protect them from serious illnesses. Tetanus is a very serious and painful toxin that can cause hospitalization or even death. Diphtheria can cause paralysis, heart failure or death. Pertussis or whooping cough spreads very easily and can be deadly for babies or elderly people. In Ohio, the Tdap vaccine is required for entry into the 7th Grade.

Is the Tdap vaccine expesive?

Most insurance companies cover the Tdap vaccine. Ask your doctor about the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program, which provides vaccines for children ages 18 and younger who are uninsured and Medicaid-eligible.

Is the Tdap vaccine safe?

The Tdap vaccine has been studied very carefully and is safe. The CDC and FDA continue to monitor the safety of vaccines including the Tdap vaccination. The CDC uses 3 systems to monitor the safety of vaccines including the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), Vaccines Safety Datalink (VSD), and the Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment Project (CISA). The vaccine can cause mild side effects like redness and soreness in the arm where the shot was given.